Posts Tagged ‘Physics’

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CERN: The Standard Model Of Particle Physics

www.facebook.com … The Standard Model Of Particle Physics. This film was produced as part of the CERN/ATLAS multimedia contest internship. — Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • www.youtube.com • www.youtube.com • www.youtube.com — STANDARD MODEL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS: www.youtube.com 1) First Second Of The Universe: www.youtube.com 2) Force And Matter: www.youtube.com 3) Quarks: www.youtube.com 4) Gluons: www.youtube.com 5) Electrons, Protons And Neutrons: www.youtube.com 6) Photons, Gravitons & Weak Bosons: www.youtube.com 7) Neutrinos: www.youtube.com 8) The Higgs Boson / The Higgs Mechanism: www.youtube.com — The standard model of particle physics is a theory concerning the electromagnetic, weak and strong nuclear interactions which mediate the dynamics of the known subatomic particles. Developed throughout the early and middle 20th century, the current formulation was finalized in the mid 1970s upon experimental confirmation of the existence of quarks. Since then, discoveries of the bottom quark (1977), the top quark (1995) and the tau neutrino (2000) have given credence to the standard model. Because of its success in explaining a wide variety of experimental results, the standard model is sometimes regarded as a theory of almost everything. Still, the standard model falls short of being a complete theory of fundamental interactions because it does not incorporate the physics of general relativity, such as gravitation and dark energy. The theory does not
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Quantum Physics with Arun Gopan

This is Arun Gopan from India.

Experimental research on physics and hardware for quantum information processing

[Keio Spintronics Network – Tarucha-Oiwa Laboratory , University of Tokyo] Tokyo University’s Tarucha-Oiwa Laboratory is doing experimental research on physics and hardware for quantum information processing, which utilizes electron transport, spin correlation, and spin in low-dimensional electron systems. The laboratory is looking at electron systems in one and zero dimensions, which can be achieved through semiconductor microfabrication. The researchers study the fundamental physics of many-body effects in artificial atoms and molecules, spin phenomena in strong magnetic fields, the effects of conduction phenomena on electron and nuclear spin, electronic properties in one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids, and spin quantum computing. In addition, the Lab is developing a method of observing state density directly, using a surface-sensitive scanning probe. “In our Lab, the main theme is how to precisely control, investigate, and utilize the quantum mechanical properties of the most basic particles in semiconductors — the atoms. We started this research about 15 years ago. At that time, when we fabricated small structures called quantum dots, we were the first in the world to find out experimentally how to confine electrons in quantum dots, investigate their properties, and control their states.” When electrons are injected one by one into artificial atoms, they occupy orbits, due to the quantum confinement effect, and take on energy levels, like those in real atoms
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Einstein’s Relativity in Modern Physics I The Great Courses

www.thegreatcourses.com Welcome to Einstein’s Relativity and the Quantum Revolution: A Course in Modern Physics for Non-Scientists. I’m Professor Rich Wolfson from Middlebury College. And before I begin, I’d just like to say a little about my title, to emphasize two terms in that title. First of all, the term modern physics. This is a course in the great ideas that shaped the physics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It’s not a course in all of physics. And it’s not a course in the really latest, most contemporary ideas, although we will touch on those. Rather, it’s a course in the true, fundamental ideas that set the tone for all the physics that’s occurred since the year 1900. But this course is primarily about the key ideas of twentieth century physics. The big ideas. The two great big ideas. And what are those big ideas? Well, the two big ideas are relativity—developed primarily by Albert Einstein, although with help from others—and quantum physics, which was developed by a whole slew of physicists. Einstein first told us about relativity in 1905. He expanded on relativity in 1914. And the rest of the twentieth century constituted of an exploration by physicists trying to verify that Einstein was correct. And in the last 10 years, and even in the last five years, we’ve had some remarkably dramatic confirmations of Einstein’s theories, although the essence of those theories was confirmed very early in the century. The course is going to be divided into
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Lecture 9 | New Revolutions in Particle Physics: Basic Concepts

(December 1, 2009) Leonard Susskind discusses the equations of motion of fields containing particles and quantum field theory, and shows how basic processes are coded by a Lagrangian. Stanford University: www.stanford.edu Stanford Continuing Studies Program: csp.stanford.edu Stanford University Channel on YouTube: www.youtube.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Public Lecture—Smashing Protons: First Physics at the LHC

Lecture Date: Tuesday, November 30, 2010. The Large Hadron Collider, at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, is the largest scientific instrument ever built. For nearly a year now, we have been smashing protons into each other with unprecedented energy, allowing us to peer into nature’s most intimate depths. The world’s largest and most complex cameras take snapshots of these collisions millions of times per second. These pictures reveal the smallest components of the universe – the quarks and gluons – and, someday, we hope, the elusive Higgs boson. Why do we need to build such an enormous machine in order to study particles more than a million times smaller than a speck of dust? This lecture will explain how the LHC and its detectors work, what the pictures from the LHC are telling us now, and how we will use this technology to explore the deepest secrets of the universe. Lecturer: David Miller, SLAC.

Lecture 4 | New Revolutions in Particle Physics: Standard Model

(February 1, 2010) Professor Leonard Susskind continues his discussion of group theory. This course is a continuation of the Fall quarter on particle physics. The material will focus on the Standard Model of particle physics, especially quantum chromodynamics (the theory of quarks) and the electroweak theory based on the existence of the Higgs boson. We will also explore the inadequacies of the Standard Model and why theorists are led to go beyond it. This course was originally presented in Stanford’s Continuing Studies program. Stanford University www.stanford.edu Continuing Studies at Stanford continuingstudies.stanford.edu Stanford University Channel on YouTube www.youtube.com

Lecture 2 | New Revolutions in Particle Physics: Standard Model

(January 18, 2010) Professor Leonard Susskind discusses quantum chromodynamics, the theory of quarks, gluons, and hadrons. This course is a continuation of the Fall quarter on particle physics. The material will focus on the Standard Model of particle physics, especially quantum chromodynamics (the theory of quarks) and the electroweak theory based on the existence of the Higgs boson. We will also explore the inadequacies of the Standard Model and why theorists are led to go beyond it. This course was originally presented in Stanford’s Continuing Studies program. Stanford University www.stanford.edu Stanford Continuing Studies Program csp.stanford.edu Stanford University Channel on YouTube www.youtube.com

The Standard Model of Particle Physics; QCD

Part 2 of my series about the standard model detailing gluon interactions.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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